Wartime resistance drama 'Alone in Berlin' never gets a grip on its historical moment

Publié le par Justin Chang, Contact Reporter

Wartime resistance drama 'Alone in Berlin' never gets a grip on its historical moment
Brendan Gleeson and Emma Thompson in the movie "Alone in Berlin." (IFC Films)

Brendan Gleeson and Emma Thompson in the movie "Alone in Berlin." (IFC Films)

In 1943, a German factory worker named Otto Hampel and his wife, Elise, were found guilty of treason and sedition after writing anti-Hitler slogans on postcards and secretly distributing them around Berlin. It was an ingenious campaign of silent revolt for which the Hampels were ultimately executed by guillotine, though their brave legacy survived in the files of the Gestapo and was subsequently enshrined in Hans Fallada’s 1947 novel, “Every Man Dies Alone” (an English translation of which was published in 2009).

A number of film and TV adaptations have already been made of Fallada’s book, the latest being “Alone in Berlin,” a well-acted but creaky and curiously bloodless portrait of life during wartime from the Swiss-born actor turned director Vincent Pérez. The film stars Brendan Gleeson and Emma Thompson as Otto and Anna Quangel, who find themselves under psychological siege in a Berlin where everyone speaks German-accented English, and the worst horrors are either kept politely off camera or filtered through the gently softening light of Christophe Beaucarne’s cinematography.

It begins with a brief evocation of the 1940 Battle of France whose attempt at stark simplicity comes off as merely underpopulated; war may be hell, but that sentiment will be conveyed more through the actors’ restrained conviction than any particular sense of verisimilitude. A young German soldier named Hans (Louis Hofmann) is shot down by enemy soldiers in a forest glade, and word of his death soon reaches his parents, Otto and Anna, around the same time that their country is celebrating France’s defeat.

In reality, it was the death of Elise Hampel’s brother that spurred her and her husband to take action against Hitler’s Germany, quietly channeling their grief into a posture of defiance. But Fallada, showing the shrewd instincts of an emotional strategist, reconfigured that loss as the death of an only child. The payoff in Pérez’s movie is undeniable when Otto writes “The Führer murdered my son; he will murder yours” on a postcard and leaves it on the bustling staircase of a nearby building.

Publié dans Articles de Presse

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